Reports

A Report on Energy Efficiency and Energy Mix in the Indian Energy System (2030) Using India Energy Security Scenarios, 2047

Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF), Government of India, requested the Ministry of Power (MoP) to provide inputs for determining India’s Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) for submission to COP-21 (Paris). NITI Aayog was requested to provide inputs on determining the INDCs via energy projections till the year 2030. The Report responds to the above request of MoP to NITI to provide the projections sought by MoEF using the IESS, 2047. India Energy Security Scenarios, 2047 (IESS) is essentially a bottom-up model. In the Indian setting, where different energy sources are planned separately, it becomes important to identify sectoral targets and yet subject them to stress tests in an aggregate scenario. Accordingly, it was possible to adopt electricity projections for the year 2030 using IESS. The other forms of energy (solid and liquid) were generated using the same assumptions which were applied for electricity, thereby allowing estimations of energy efficiency and energy mix as well.

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Energy Efficiency Interventions at NITI Aayog

Residential and Commercial sectors account for 29% of the total electricity consumption in India and this share is rising at a rate of 8% annually. The Indian commercial sector exhibits a massive savings potential on the demand side, through energy efficiency interventions. There is also an opportunity, which can be leveraged on the supply side by introducing renewable energy generation in buildings. For this, there is a need for tackling various gaps including the problem of information asymmetry through the propagation of project experiences and best practices and the issue of transactional barriers.

The report talks about how NITI Aayog has set a national precedent by initiating two types of energy efficiency interventions:

  • Applicability of energy efficiency retrofits in order to move towards securing a BEE 5 star rating for its office.
  • Approaching the MNRE for the assessment of the feasibility and subsequent deployment of Solar PV panels on the rooftop of NITI Aayog.

This paper tries to address information asymmetry and capture the above interventions to showcase NITI Aayog as a demonstration project in energy efficiency interventions and map the way forward in terms of an easier and widespread adoption of energy efficiency measures in buildings.

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Deliberations of the Task Force on Roadmap for India on Solar & Wind Energy beyond 13th Plan 

Energy security is a critical strategic and economic issue for India. The National Action Plan on Climate Change launched by the Hon’ble Prime Minister on June 30, 2008 emphasized the need for a graduated shift from economic activity based on fossil to one based on non-fossil fuels, and from reliance on nonrenewable and depleting sources of energy to renewable sources. The Planning Commission thus constituted a task force in June 2013 and identified various issues. The report brings out the broad suggestions made by the members of the Task Force. Given the severity of the situation, the task force focused on certain key areas and suggested early action measures.

India’s coal generation capacity and installed electricity generation capacity is significantly higher than that of peak demand. Despite this, some parts of the country face acute power shortages. In addition, India’s major advantage is that its renewable energy potential is vast and largely untapped. But to capture the benefits of RE, India would need to make available necessary capital and get comfortable with managing the variability and uncertainty of RE generation in conjunction with the existing and planned fossil fuel-based and large power plants. With these challenges in mind, the NITI Aayog constituted an Expert Group in June 2015 to assess the requirements and utilization of public finance for achieving 175 GW RE by 2022.

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Report of the Expert Group on 175GW RE by 2022

India’s coal generation capacity and installed electricity generation capacity is significantly higher than that of peak demand. Despite this, some parts of the country face acute power shortages. In addition, India’s major advantage is that its renewable energy potential is vast and largely untapped. But to capture the benefits of RE, India would need to make available necessary capital and get comfortable with managing the variability and uncertainty of RE generation in conjunction with the existing and planned fossil fuel-based and large power plants. With these challenges in mind, the NITI Aayog constituted an Expert Group in June 2015 to assess the requirements and utilization of public finance for achieving 175 GW RE by 2022.

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Meeting growing energy demand through solar power

Kamakhya Misra is a second semester Freshman pursuing her Bachelor of Science degree at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University, New York. Her academic interests include an intersection of business, environmental and sustainability sciences. With a strong proclivity for the renewable energy sector, Kamakhya interned under the Energy vertical at the NITI Aayog. During her time at the NITI Aayog, she was responsible for studying the technical, financial and economic aspects of solar rooftops and their viability in India’s domestic, commercial and industrial sectors. She was tasked with identifying key problem areas and proposing solutions to increase solar penetration and improve consumer sustainability habits.

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India Energy

India Energy